Reading & Writing

History Out of Context- That’s You New Mexico, Louisiana & South Dakota

As a method for blending current events, journalism, and poetry, my English classes did poetry in the news a few times a month when I was teaching.  It was a great integration of free verse, word study and and getting students more engaged in community, national and world news.  I no longer teach middle and high school students, but as an educator and lifelong learner I find it useful to continue the practice on my own to convey newsworthy educational issues through poetry…especially during National Poetry Month.  Education Week has been a good source for issues related to school administrators, teachers, students; including a previous post, “Things Educators Carry as Covid Carries On.”   My most recent effort relates to the current political efforts to cover up parts of our history through legislative actions creating policy that marginalizes the need for continued efforts for equity and social justice.

Things Educators Carry As Covid Carries On

One of my favorite activities with students when teaching English/language arts was found poetry. It motivated the full spectrum of students because it had all sorts of word play, and could connect it with all genres of reading. Reluctant readers could be asked to look at a page of text from the literature we were reading and simply list some of the favorite words they found on a page. Motivated readers could do the same and the activity leveled the reading and comprehension playing field as we shared words, strung them together to make meaning. Over the course of a chapter, students could take the words to create a free verse poem to try to capture an element of the story. It was a great entry-point for demystifying poetry, increasing class wide comfort for sharing, and segueing into discussion at large. …

The Fog of Literacy

Thinking About Literacy Part II

 

As the politics of school standardized test results continually ratchet up, the fortune of good leadership described in Thinking about Literacy Part I resonated through the lens of a conference I attended.  The topic was a proposed a switch in our state (NH) to move from one high stakes testing period per year to two, potentially creating a more vicious cycle of accountability and teaching to the test. In my view, increased standardized testing  is counterproductive to motivating reading and writing. Ultimately, the biannual testing became a choice of individual school districts.  Districts choosing to test twice though with one set of tests still had to give the annual state mandated test; meaning students in some districts were tested 3 times a year. …

Has the Word Literacy Become a Cliché in the World of Education?

Thinking About Literacy Part I

 

 

 

We all have memories that become moments integrating into our ongoing stream of consciousness that connect to facets of our daily lives.  A recent moment returned me to 1967 as I drove my parents’ car into the now demolished Dorchester, MA Neponset Drive-In with three  passengers, two of whom were hidden in the trunk. Once we all made it comfortably into the car, we settled in to watch The Graduate, a movie that resonated for four teenage boys because of Mrs. Robinson and the graduate’s (Dustin Hoffman) love interest.  However,  it was one iconic word of advice that brought me back to the present and unfortunately was predictably accurate…”Plastics!” Today, as we address issues of climate change, plastics is one of the key challenges to reducing our carbon footprints. 

As a graduate student, I received a piece of advice that was just as iconic as ‘plastics’; at least for me. Ted Sizer, a founder of the Coalition of Essential Schools(CES) was a guest in my class, Educational Issues & The Politics of Policy. He spoke of the Coalition’s philosophy centered on its 10 Common Principles, one of which was “Less is More.” The reductionist notion wasn’t originally coined by Sizer. Poet, Robert Browning, used the phrase in his 1855 poem, and multiple architects are given credit for coming up with the phrase in connection with a minimalist building designs during the mid twentieth century. For Sizer and the CES, the educational connection to less is more meant “curricular decisions should be guided by the aim of thorough student mastery and achievement rather than by an effort to merely cover content.”

Which brings me to an overused word in the educational arena today that might carry the same insidiousness going forward that has evolved with plastics over the last 50+ years…literacy

A Sense of Place

The following posting appeared as a column in our community’s local daily. It’s a reflection on a fantastic annual local literary festival( Newburyport Literary Festival )which had to move online because of the pandemic

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One of my favorite times of the year is the Newburyport Literary Festival, and the most recent one that concluded a few weeks ago had a session that struck me as a metaphor for life in Newburyport, the challenges of work, school and the community brought on by the pandemic for over a year; and how the pandemic will continue to shape our world moving forward.  First, a bit of background.  The Literary Festival put Newburyport on the map for me 10 years ago.  Prior to that, I had been Portsmouth, NH centric, with occasional drop-ins to Newburyport.  The energy of the festival, the venues used for author presentations, and the nooks and crannies of the community for discussion, coffee and reflection created a sense of place that I hadn’t experienced in other communities.  After several years of attending the Literary and Documentary Film Festivals, my wife and I found that spirit of community too strong to resist and we moved to Newburyport.

That bond of community hasn’t disappointed, but the pandemic has thrown in a heavy dose of disruption that has seen businesses and schools needing to make huge adjustments to create hybrid worlds for continuing on safely with our lives. That has been viewed as a disadvantage by many as the suddenness of having to shift to hybrid, remote, Zoom based relationships has created an exhaustion and feeling of isolation for many.  One teacher recently shared with me her exhaustion on a Saturday morning.  She said that hers wasn’t an end of the week exhaustion; rather, it was an exhaustion of the soul. …